COVID-19 Vaccine Update: Boosters, COVID in Pregnancy and Flu Shot with COVID Vaccine

COVID-19 Vaccine Update: Boosters, COVID in Pregnancy and Flu Shot with COVID Vaccine

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) recommends that all eligible persons including individuals who are pregnant, breastfeeding and or considering pregnancy or undergoing fertility treatment, receive a COVID-19 vaccine or vaccine series and booster when indicated.

The Practice Advisory developed by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists’ Immunization, Infectious Disease, and Public Health Preparedness Expert Work Group provides overview of currently available COVID-19 vaccines and guidance for their use in pregnant, recently pregnant, and nonpregnant individuals.

Claims linking COVID-19 vaccines to infertility are unfounded and have no scientific evidence supporting them. Given the mechanism of action and the safety profile of the mRNA vaccines in pregnant and nonpregnant individuals, the benefits of vaccination are tremendous.

Should I Get the COVID Vaccine Booster Dose?

ACOG recommends that pregnant and breastfeeding people receive a booster dose of the Covid 19 vaccine.

These recommendations also apply to pregnant and recently pregnant (up to 6 weeks postpartum) individuals who completed their initial COVID-19 vaccine or vaccine series prior to or during pregnancy.

Healthcare workers and severely immunocompromised women should receive a booster, also.

Specifically:

  • Pregnant and recently pregnant people who received J&J/Janssen vaccine should receive a COVID-19 booster at least 2 months following their initial vaccine.
  • Pregnant and recently pregnant people who a Pfizer or Moderna vaccine should receive a booster at least 6 months following their initial vaccine series.
  • Pregnant and recently pregnant people can receive any COVID-19 vaccine available to them for their booster dose; it does not have to be the same product as their initial vaccine or vaccine series.

COVID in Pregnancy

As of September 18, 2021, only 31 percent of pregnant individuals have been vaccinated against COVID-19 (CDC COVID Data Tracker).

Pregnant and recently pregnant patients with COVID-19 are at increased risk of more severe illness compared with nonpregnant peers. Available data indicate an increased risk of ICU admission, need for mechanical ventilation and ventilatory support (ECMO), and death reported in pregnant women with symptomatic COVID-19 infection, when compared with symptomatic nonpregnant women Pregnant and recently pregnant patients with obesity and diabetes may be at an even higher risk of severe illness.

Can I get the COVID Vaccine and the Flu Shot at the Same Time?

Yes, COVID-19 vaccines may be administered simultaneously with other vaccines, including vaccines routinely administered during pregnancy, such as influenza and Tdap.

COVID-19 vaccine development and regulatory approval is a rapidly changing process, and information and recommendations will evolve as more data are collected about the vaccines and their use in specific populations.



You’re unique.
Your fertility plan should be too.